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Pediatricians in Brampton – What to Look Out For

What is a Pediatrician?

Pediatricians are medical doctors that specialize in the health care of children from ages zero months to 18 years. Some pediatricians will agree to see a patient up until the age of 21 years. They evaluate, diagnose, and treat minor to severe conditions.

A pediatrician will conduct your child’s annual checkups and give nutrition and fitness advice. Additionally, they offer referrals to specialists when necessary.

Why Does Every Child Need a Pediatrician?

Proper health care is crucial no matter someone’s age. The reason every child needs a pediatrician is that they specialize in the care of children. They will ensure that your child is happy, healthy, and meeting all of their milestones.

If your child is not experiencing the above criteria, a good pediatrician will give you advice and treatment to remedy that. No matter the illness, condition, or disease, early intervention is essential. The child’s annual checkup with their pediatrician lets early intervention happen if a health concern arises.

What You Should Know About Taking Your Child to The Doctor for The First Time

Preparing yourself for a child’s first doctor’s visit is a critical step in the process. Knowing what information you will need to share with the doctor can help ensure that your child receives the best care possible.

Taking an infant to the doctor for the first time requires you to share information about your child’s feeding habits, digestion, sleeping patterns. Some doctors may also ask for your family’s health history.

Your baby may also be given the hepatitis B vaccine if it did not receive it at birth. The doctor will also measure your baby’s height, weight, and the circumference of their head. Additionally, the doctor will examine their eyes and reflexes.

If you are taking a non-infant child to a new pediatrician for the first time, you may want to prepare yourself to share a wealth of information. The pediatrician will want to know the health history of the child and your family. That will help them look for any indicators of abnormal health issues or symptoms.

Similar to an infant’s first appointment, the doctor will measure your child’s height and weight. That will help them ensure that the child has a healthy BMI (Body Mass Index) for their age and height. If your child is over the age of four and in good health, they will start receiving yearly instead of monthly checkups.

What Vaccines Your Child Should Get?

Knowing which vaccines your child needs and at what age they should be given helps maintain their overall health. Here is a comprehensive list that breaks down what vaccines a child needs and what age a pediatrician will administer them.

At two months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Haemophilus Influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate 13 (Pneu-C-13)
  • Rotavirus (Rot-5)

At four months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Haemophilus Influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib)
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate 13 (Pneu-C-13)
  • Rotavirus (Rot-5)

At six months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Haemophilus Influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib)
  • Rotavirus (Rot-5)

Babies 6 months and older should receive a flu vaccination every flu season.

At seven to eleven months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Typically, there are no scheduled vaccinations at this age range. However, if your baby has not received the previously mentioned shots, this would be a good time to administer them.

At twelve months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Pneumococcal Conjugate 13 (Pneu-C-13)
  • Meningococcal Conjugate C (Men-C-C)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

At fifteen months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Varicella (Var)

At eighteen months old, your child should receive the following.

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Haemophilus Influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib)

Between the ages of two and three years, your child should receive the following.

  • There is no schedule for this age, but your pediatrician may have some recommendations. Additionally, children six months or older should receive a flu vaccination every flu season.

At four years of age, your child should receive the following.

  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella (MMRV)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, Polio (Tdap-IPV)

Between the ages of four and six years, your child should receive the following.

Between the ages of seven and ten years, your child should receive the following.

  • There is no schedule for this age, but your pediatrician may have some recommendations. Additionally, children six months or older should receive a flu vaccination every flu season.

Between the ages of eleven and twelve years, your child should receive the following.

  • Flu Vaccine every flu season

Between the ages of twelve to thirteen years, your child should receive the following.

  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)
  • Meningococcal Conjugate ACYW-135 (Men-C-ACYW)
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV-9)

These vaccines are typically offered by school-based immunization programs.

At the age of fourteen years, your child should receive the following.

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap)

Between the ages of fourteen and eighteen years, your child should receive the following.

  • There is no schedule for this age, but your pediatrician may have some recommendations. Additionally, children 6 months or older should receive a flu vaccination every flu season.
  • They may also need vaccinations for travel.

At the age of twenty-four, an individual should receive the following.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap)

They should also receive a booster shot of TD (Tetanus, Diphtheria) every 10 years following this age.

This chart may be long but it’s essential for your child’s health. Also, children between the ages of six months and eight years who have not previously received an Influenza vaccine require two doses given four weeks apart.

What Makes a Good Pediatrician?

Three key components make for a good pediatrician. The best pediatrician will take time to understand your child and their needs. They will also have an understanding of holistic health practices and that every child has different needs. And last but not least they will partner with you on ensuring the health of your child.

Register Today With a Top Rated Pediatrician

Intrepid Medical Centre works is home to top rated Pediatricians, if you would like to register your children with one of our pediatricians please click the button below and our team will reach out to you shortly.